New Issue Out Today!

September Issue!!

The summer has come and gone, and The Kaje is still here! Issue 5 is our best to date with an array of well-known, and some not so well-known artists gracing our magazine. Come take a look…

Read it here!

Email us at thekaje@thekaje.com to ensure you get updates on our future issues. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

The September issue contains:

Stornoway “A living, breathing Mark Twain novel.”
Levi Miller “I thought it was great to be famous enough to have your picture on a pencil case.”
Eliza Doolittle “I have something to work towards rather than something to live up to.”

Tye Matthew Harris “I believe a point comes when you have to change things in your life.”
Dog Is Dead “We’d like people to think of us as a choir and an orchestra making pop music.”
Chris Anthony “It is much better to be inspired than to think up new ideas if that makes sense.”
Example “I just want people to take my music for what it is.”
The Milk “We just play really well with each other.”
Motion City Soundtrack “We are like family. We have learned to live around each other.”

Freemasons “It is only a matter of time before albums are released as apps…”
Tara Mathew “I just feel transformed to a different world when I perform.”
K. Anderson “As a teenager all I listened to was music by lesbian.”

Win! Win!

Forgotten Gems:

Album: Shelby Lynne “I am Shelby Lynne”
Book: Jim Thompson The Killer Inside Me”
Film: Rebecca

Designer of the Month: Robot Alien Clothing

Reviews:
Albums: Locnville “Sun In My Pocket”, Capac “Pastels EP”, Fyfe Dangerfield “Fly Yellow Moon”, She Makes War “Disarm”, Aaron Wright and The Aprils “Behold A Pale Horse”
Singles of The Month: The Like “Wishing He Was Dead”. Dog is Dead “Young”
Live Music: V Festival, Kendal Calling , Summer Sundae, One Night Only, Wildbird & Peacedrums
Theatre: Corrie!, Sound Of Music, Joseph
Film: Robin Hood, Kick-Ass
Books: Matthew Yorke “Pictures of Lily”, JockyBoy26 “The Big Book of Gaydar (Uncut!)”

The Kaje talks Kendal Calling to British Sea Power

The conceptual indie 4-piece hailing from Brighton, British Sea Power have built up a huge cult following during their 10 years as a band. They recently sold out their own mini festival Tan Hill in the Lake District at Britain’s highest pub! Kendal Calling favourites British Sea Power return this year to the main stage and we’ve had a chat with them to find out more.

You’ve played Kendal Calling before, what is your best KC memory?

The first year we headlined the big tent in the park by Abbott’s Hall where I used to do harmless naughty things occasionally involving cider. I remember looking out from the stage and seeing Martin (from the band) up the central pole and thinking that it was funny.

Tell us about the sold out Tan Hill festival you just promoted in Britain’s highest pub! Were the revelers well-behaved?

Some of the revelers were well-behaved and some suffered a kind of bonfire fever. It was pretty cold but I saw more bands than I did last time at Glastonbury. The electric shocks on the last night when we had a power cut on stage remains a fairly vivid memory as well as the ensuing mid-gig break filled triumphantly by six-year-old Louis’ first drum experiment.

There’s a pretty big line up at the festival this year, will you be looking out for anyone else’s sets?

I d like to see the Wild Beasts and probably The Coral ‘cos I saw half a set of there’s once and it was very good.

Do you prefer performing at big scale outdoor festivals or more intimate indoor club shows?

I like the out-door ones that have a good atmosphere like Green Man and Kendal Calling. It is dangerous though, I once had a flashback at a Glastonbury show and with all the grubby crowds and flags and what not I  thought I was in the Lord of the Rings or something. Luckily King Arthur turned up and it was a good one.

How do you think indie music has changed over the past decade? How do you feel your music has evolved?

Well beneath indies graceful style switch to the 80s it’s still essentially the same kind of people doing the same kinds of things. Oh and those new doppelgänger types that look like indie bands but have just been trained to pass themselves off as such. I don’t know if I’m the right person to ask as I judge music on its compatibility with driving and high scoring on Mario Kart. My current no.1 being Snoop Dog.

What is the craziest thing a fan has done?

Female self masturbation whilst dancing in crowd. If a man did that he’d be either in big trouble or a dogger or both but people just gave her space.

The Lake District is a beautiful backdrop for a festival, where will we find you at dawn?

I don’t really know…

What bands did you aspire to when you were starting out and have you met them?

I sat next to Frank Black in Japan whilst he ate noodles. He seemed to really be enjoying them so I never said hello but it was still quite good fun. The Pixies were my favourite band for many many years whilst I was at school.

The Kaje talks Kendal Calling to People Get Real

Peter Wilson and Simon Lister are the duo the make up People Get Real. Combining both their DJing and Production skills together has meant that they create out of the ordinary mixes, with sets varying tempo and style setting them out from the rest of the crowd. Since 2002 the duo have been hitting dancefloors all around the country, exciting crowds with their unique blend and there’s a definate possibility of house, techno and even pop music hitting this years Kendal Calling in August as People Get Real perform in the lake district, and we managed to sneak a quick chat with them to find out more…

What does the Lake District mean to you?

Lakes, mountains, hills, picturesque villages, rain and the pencil museum too…..

What’s the best thing about the English countryside?

All the sheep

Kendal Calling celebrates its fifth birthday this year – what’s the best birthday present you’ve given/received?

Best present given – Felt street BMX

Best present received – Depeche Mode gig tickets

What makes small independent festivals so special?

The line-ups are often totally different to those you’d see at a larger festival…. often they can be just the same procession of Bands… you’ll always see something a bit different, or unexpected at a smaller festival

Where did you make your first festival appearance as an artist and how was it for you?

Evolution Festival in Newcastle was the first festival we played at, we’d always done the after-parties for it but last year we played the actual festival for the first time.

What’s your preferred way to commune with nature?

Television documentaries usually or walking the dog!

When are you at your most creative/inspired?

Usually when we can get some peace and look at getting down to some serious work…. we’re pretty disciplined in the studio so often most of our inspiration and creativity comes when we’re there.

What’s your best/worst festival memory?

Best festival memory would have to be seeing Liam Howlett DJing at Gatecrasher Summer Sound System it was just after the Dirtchamber Sessions mix was released…. he played an amazing set.  Also seeing Riccardo Villalobos and Ryan Elliott playing closing sets at Sonar Festival with the sun coming up was pretty special.

Not sure we have any particular bad memories….. the toilets can give anyone nightmares likewise cues/prices at any festival bar!

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learnt from festival life?

Always take more money than you think you’ll need and never ever wear your best trainers to any festival!

Apart from your set, how will you spend the rest of the festival weekend?

We’ll be checking out the line-ups on the various stages, also see what’s going on in the soapbox… that all looks interesting.

What’s the most fun you can have in a field?

Apart from the obvious?

The Kaje talks Kendal Calling to Mark Chadwick

With hits spanning over the past two decades and their unique blend of traditional english music and punk, The Levellers could definately teach us a thing or two to anyone about touring and performing at festivals. In a break from the band, lead singer Mark Chadwick is heading out solo, so The Kaje got his views on his views of the lake district and the up and coming Kendal Calling.

What does the Lake District mean to you?
Scafell a long walk let’s say

What’s the best thing about the English countryside?
When the sun shines can you think of anywhere else you’d rather be? I can’t

Kendal Calling celebrates its fifth birthday this year – what’s the best birthday present you’ve given/received?
Socks

What makes small independent festivals so special?
The lovely lack of branding (you would hope) – that and new faces.

Where did you make your first festival appearance as an artist and how was it for you?
Treworgey in Cornwall – glad to be alive to tell the tale

What’s your preferred way to commune with nature?
Liberty caps

When are you at your most creative/inspired?
Never anywhere near a guitar or mic…….bugger

What’s your best/worst festival memory?
None. Surely that’s the point

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learnt from festival life?
Always expect the unexpected

Apart from your set, how will you spend the rest of the festival weekend?
Making the most of a lovely weekend in the Lake District – bands, walks, etc

What’s the most fun you can have in a field?
Watching Mark Chadwick, cold beer in your hand and warm sun on your back

1. What does the Lake District mean to you?
Scafell a long walk let’s say

2. What’s the best thing about the English countryside?
When the sun shines can you think of anywhere else you’d rather be? I can’t

3. Kendal Calling celebrates its fifth birthday this year – what’s the best birthday present you’ve given/received?
Socks

4. What makes small independent festivals so special?
The lovely lack of branding (you would hope) – that and new faces.

5. Where did you make your first festival appearance as an artist and how was it for you?
Treworgey in Cornwall – glad to be alive to tell the tale

6. What’s your preferred way to commune with nature?
Liberty caps

7. When are you at your most creative/inspired?
Never anywhere near a guitar or mic…….bugger

8. What’s your best/worst festival memory?
None. Surely that’s the point

9. What’s the most important lesson you’ve learnt from festival life?
Always expect the unexpected

10. Apart from your set, how will you spend the rest of the festival weekend?
Making the most of a lovely weekend in the Lake District – bands, walks, etc

11. What’s the most fun you can have in a field?
Watching Mark Chadwick, cold beer in your hand and warm sun on your back

The Kaje talks Kendal Calling to Evil Nine

The pair of DJ’s have come along way since meeting in Brighton just over a decade ago. Since then they have been re writing the rules of what constitutes Breakbeat music and have created a following from not being afraid to try new things. With regular appearances from the duo at London’s “Fabric” and Sheffield’s “Urban Gorilla” We get a chance to chat to them about swapping the big town for the quiet life when they play Kendal Calling in just under a month:

What does the Lake District mean to you?

I guess it’s the sort of place that reminds us how beautiful the English countryside can be and how lucky we are to have it on our doorstep. Peoples’ first thoughts are to go abroad on holiday but I could just as easily drink in the awesomeness of the Lake District or the New Forest, is this interview for the Lake District Tourism Board?

What’s the best thing about the English countryside?

It’s here, it’s in England and you can just jump in a car and go enjoy it. Walks, picnics, beautiful wildlife or a quick game of Boules, you name it the English countryside can provide.

Kendal Calling celebrates its fifth birthday this year – what’s the best birthday present you’ve given/received?

My girlfriend bought me a gold ring thats shaped as a eagle claw holding a red garnet stone from a bespoke jewellery shop in Brighton called Baroque, the websites www.baroquejewellery.com by the way.

What makes small independent festivals so special?

The big festivals are fun but the commercial aspect of them kinda gets me down and the big acts seem to be getting more and more dull and middle aged, you do get to see some great classic artists once in a while but I’d rather see new bands headlining the main stages. Oh and they have less flags than the big festivals.

Where did you make your first festival appearance as an artist and how was it for you?

I think the first festival we did was Glade, I could be wrong though. It was all a massive blur really but i do remember the gig being pretty amazing and the crowd being a lot more up for it than the clubs we’d played in previously. We used to play a lot of free parties in the countryside in Brighton and I remember thinking it was like playing at one but we were getting paid for the privilege.

What’s your preferred way to commune with nature?

A nice walk in the Lake District?

When are you at your most creative/inspired?

I guess it’s after a good weekend of gigs when you’ve still got the buzz from playing in front of a bunch of people or after hearing some new music by another artist old or new that blows your mind and opens you up to new sounds.

What’s your best/worst festival memory?

We had a live gig with our band at Glastonbury and it was cancelled due do storms while we were in a queue trying to get in and they weren’t letting people in or out so we ended up dropping half the band off at the train station and going to the pub until they started letting people back into the festival. The next day i queued up for an hour backstage to have a shower and once i got in it someone had done a massive duke (poopy) in it, I had to have a shower squashed into the opposite corner and i think it was winking at me. The rest of the festival was my favourite Glastonbury though.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learnt from festival life?

Take an inflatable air mattress.

Apart from your set, how will you spend the rest of the festival weekend?

To be honest we probably won’t be at the festival for long because we’ll have another gig to go to but i would imagine it would be trying to see as many acts as possible, eating festival food and drinking a lot of booze.

What’s the most fun you can have in a field?

Go to Kendall Calling of course.

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